Sand Colic….Different?

Sand colic is a specific type of colic seen in horses that live in a sandy environment. It accounts for about 5% of all colics seen. Sand colic presents with symptoms similar to any generic colic, such as inappetence, pawing, rolling, looking or kicking at the stomach, distress and unease, and dehydration. One sign thatContinue reading “Sand Colic….Different?”

Tis the Season…Be Careful!

The definition of liability is “the state of being responsible for something, especially by law”. Sadly, the holiday season can bring out both the best and worst in folks leaving some horse owners subject to losses they weren’t expecting. Lately, we’ve heard numerous stories from clients who have hired “equine” contractors or services only toContinue reading “Tis the Season…Be Careful!”

Horses Get Cavities Too!

Horse’s teeth have the same composition as human teeth and just like humans, they can get cavities. As the life expectancy of horses has increased, our ability to treat dental caries has a huge impact….the cost of placing a composite filling into an equine cavity can preserve the integrity of the tooth and may preventContinue reading “Horses Get Cavities Too!”

Equine Odontoclastic Tooth Resorption and Hypercementosis…..EOTRH for Short!

Equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis. A long name for a complicated disease. Thankfully, we shorten the name to EOTRH (or “E-roth” as we say). EOTRH is a degenerative disease that affects the incisors and canines, in most cases. There have been a few select reports of it also involving the first premolars, but itContinue reading “Equine Odontoclastic Tooth Resorption and Hypercementosis…..EOTRH for Short!”

AED is Proud to Sponsor PHA’s Annual “Equines for K9’s” Benefit

Please come join Advanced Equine Dentistry as we support the Pasco County Horseman’s Association and the Pasco County Sheriffs Canine Team on November 8th, 2020! Great organizations and lots of equine fun and prizes! Don’t miss the K9 Demonstration! Stop by the AED trailer and say “Hi”!

What’s the Deal with Wolf Teeth?

Whenever we check a new horse, especially a younger one, we look for the presence of wolf teeth. Wolf teeth are typically present just in front of the first cheek tooth, and can be present on both the top (more common) and the bottom jaw. They are numbered 105/205/305/405 and are present in around 70%Continue reading “What’s the Deal with Wolf Teeth?”